Thursday, April 12, 2007

Peace for our time?

This morning my mother read a letter to the editor that was published in the Los Angeles Daily News:

Political statement

Re "Pro or con, feelings strong on flag display" (McCarthy, April 10):

Alex Reza gave himself the lie by his statement that our soldiers' deaths are unjustified and by his placard, "How many more?" So his display is political, after all, and a sordid attack on the sensibilities of the soldiers' families.

How many more? That depends partly on our resolve to finish the job. In the 1930s the Europeans tried appeasing the fascists, who were free to rearm and attack when they were ready. Chamberlain's "peace in our time" cost the world 50 million dead. We didn't fight until we, too, had been attacked, losing as many on the first day as in four years in Iraq - and 400,000 not 3,000, dead by the end.

- Louis Richter
Encino


My mother (who is British and grew up in England during WWII) sighed and then said: "I can remember how angry my father was with Chamberlain's: Peace for Our Time:

We, the German Fuhrer and Chancellor, and the British Prime Minister, have had a further meeting today and are agreed in recognizing that the question of Anglo-German relations is of the first importance for our two countries and for Europe.

We regard the agreement signed last night and the Anglo-German Naval Agreement as symbolic of the desire of our two peoples never to go to war with one another again.

We are resolved that the method of consultation shall be the method adopted to deal with any other questions that may concern our two countries, and we are determined to continue our efforts to remove possible sources of difference, and thus to contribute to assure the peace of Europe.

My good friends, for the second time in our history, a British Prime Minister has returned from Germany bringing peace with honor. I believe it is "peace for our time." Go home and get a nice quiet sleep .

Well, last nice quiet sleep didn't last long, did it? And it is kind of creepy how he talks about himself in the third person, glorifying the honor of having returned from Germany and having secured "peace in our time."

6 Comments:

Blogger Sarah said...

You know, something I've never been able to understand. Den Beste got a lot of crap when he wrote that to him an American life is worth more than another nationality. If Liberals truly believe that all lives are equally valuable, then why is it OK to pull US troops out and let Iraqis die in their stead? Iraqis were dying at a higher rate per day before we got there than they are now, and Americans die at a higher rate in D.C. than in Iraq, so the math doesn't add up here. "How many more" loses its meaning in that light.

9:18 PM  
Blogger Teresa said...

It's so easy to make people take their focus off the big picture and switch to the small screen. It's more "compassionate" in most people's eyes to think about individuals. Unfortunately, they only want to think about certain individuals.

The one major point they always turn away from. If you don't win, the enemy does... If the enemy wins - what happens.

Because something will always happen when you give up and go home. In Europe it was one of the bloodiest wars in history. In Vietnam it was the millions who died after we retreated.

They never want to hear that the best way to stay safe is to be proactive about it.

9:53 PM  
Blogger Butterfly Wife said...

Some great perspectives. Thanks for sharing ladies.

3:10 PM  
Blogger Nicole said...

I remember visiting the Eagle's Nest when we first arrived in Europe and standing in that beautiful place but at the same time realizing how creepy it was...to think that some extraordinarily deranged ideas may have been devised there. Weird.

9:18 PM  
Blogger ROGUE GUNNER said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

3:41 PM  
Blogger ROGUE GUNNER said...

Greetings from England I was based in Dortmund in Northern Germany, but enjoyed trvelling to the South and seeing the `real` Germany,

Take Care.

3:43 PM  

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